Sam Johnson: Don’t mess with marriage

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Washington, September 30, 2004 | McCall Cameron ((202) 225-4201) | comments
Today U.S. Congressman Sam Johnson (3rd Dist.-Texas) voted for the Marriage Protection Act, a proposed constitutional amendment that says “marriage in the United States shall consist solely of the union of one man and one woman.” The measure passed by a vote of 227 to 186, but did not garner the 2/3 majority vote needed to change the Constitution.
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Today U.S. Congressman Sam Johnson (3rd Dist.-Texas) voted for the Marriage Protection Act, a proposed constitutional amendment that says “marriage in the United States shall consist solely of the union of one man and one woman.” The measure passed by a vote of 227 to 186, but did not garner the 2/3 majority vote needed to change the Constitution.

“Back home we have a popular slogan, ‘Don’t mess with Texas!’ Well, I’ve got one for this debate. ‘Don’t mess with marriage!’” said Johnson, an original co-sponsor of the legislation.

Conservative congressional leaders pushed this important issue to the forefront to stop activists seeking to export the legal rights of marriage from one state to another. Massachusetts has legalized homosexual marriage. Earlier this year San Francisco city officials allowed thousands of homosexual marriages to take place. But most states and local jurisdictions still legally limit marriage to heterosexuals.

The Federal Marriage Amendment, if signed into law, would prevent federal judges from overturning the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which became law in 1996.

“The people of Texas have spoken loud and clear. Texans passed a law which recognizes marriage between a man and a woman, regardless of what other states may do. Citizens of the Lone Star State don’t want people from other states telling them how to live – and they definitely don’t want some judge telling them what marriage is.”

An outspoken advocate of defining marriage as a union between one woman and one man, Johnson vowed to continue the fight. “Today’s vote was a good indication that we are serious about protecting the sacred bonds of marriage. We may have fallen short today, but we will press on until we win for America,” concluded Johnson.

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